This Week in Comics – 1/29/2014

By: Anton Kromoff

There is about 6 inches of snow and ice outside my door. I use crutches or a wheel chair to get around. Due to these facts I am stuck inside. So the reviews for today are going to be short, as I am only downloading things I really really want to read from various Ipad digital apps. So with that…

Image

Black Science #3

Writer: Rick Remender

Artist: Matteo Scalera

Published By: Image Comics

Remender slows down the pace in issue 3, but do not let me mislead you, the hits keep coming in the most brilliant way. Matteo Scalera delivers some amazing character development moments, filling in a lot of the backstory for some of the cast. While the narrative spends half its time knee deep in action and intrigue and the other half pealing back the layers of history and intent behind the whole “Black Science” project and what exactly there goals are. This issue really does a mesmerizing job of immersing the reader in the universe, or should I say multiverse, that the story takes place in. If there were any question that this book has real potential to be something truly timeless they have all been dispelled. The hooks of Black Science are dug in deep, and I will be eagerly awaiting the next issue just to see what new wonders are coming next.

Furious #1Image

Writer: Bryan J. L. Glass

Artist: Victor Santos

Published By: Dark Horse Comics

I read through Furious issue 1 at a break neck pace. Every panel leading to the next, the narrative voice spinning into the spoken dialog and back with such a flawless transition at some point the reader protagonist separation began to break down and it was as if I was in the moment as they appeared on the page. I felt like a passenger in the mind of the main character, each emotional blow a shock to my own system. The story is flawless in its execution. The art serves as the perfect balancing force to the story, each panel from the most minimalistic panels of broken glass scattered on the ground to the detailed and richly colored panels of the character interactions are crafted with such pure intent that you can tell the hand behind them is only concerned with telling a visual story in the most masterful way possible. There is a reference to The Hobbit that made me chuckle at the same time the shear pain and emotional distress that “The Beacon” is going through had me almost sobbing just do to the emotional depth behind the characters motivation. If you have not had a chance to read Furious #1 yet, I can not stress enough how much you need to pick this book up. It does not cater to a specific audience like some books are prone to do, but instead its message stretches out into all facets of society. Even if you do not read superhero books, even if you do not read comics and you have accidentally found yourself reading a comic review, I can not stress enough how much Furious is for everyone (12 and older mind you, some of its pretty heavy on the emotional level). Its in short, simply amazing!

The Superior Spider-Man #026 Image

Written By : Dan Slot

Art By: Ramos, Rodriguez, and Martin

Published By: Marvel Comics

Well, I have to be honest, the jumping back and forth between artists was a bit bothersome to me. The writing was spot on, but with such drastic changes in style between the artist it was a bit jarring as the pages changed. The story was good. There was some really nice moments with Green Goblin and Hobgoblin fighting it out “one last time” and a bit of a nice twist at the end that was predictable, but also well executed in a way that did not make me shake my head and wonder why I had just spent cover price for a digital version of a comic I have waiting for me as soon as the snow and ice clear up enough for me to get to the shop. I have made no illusions in my 31 years on this planet that I can not stand Peter Parker as a character. So when the whole “Mind Swap” thing that started The Superior Spider-Man began I was one of the people who was rather excited to see what was going to happen with someone else in the mind of the man within the suit. I have not been disappointed with Otto Octavius in the least. In fact, I have been an avid fan of the book now that Otto is the mind driving Spider-Man. But as with all things, I knew somewhere in the back of my head, this jubilation would be short lived. Parker is making a comeback. His “soul” or “will power” or “personality” is starting to creep back in, plotting to take over his own body once more. I will be sad to see Otto go, I know its coming, with movies and cartoons and TV shows all showing Parker as Spider-Man its only a matter of time before the marketing branches deem Otto “old news” and Parker gets back in the driver seat. At least I will have the back issues to look back on with fondness.

That is all for now, I will update later in the week with the rest of the books I pick up from my local shop. But for now, Stay Safe out there.

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “This Week in Comics – 1/29/2014

  1. Pamp

    I agree regarding Superior Spider-Man and the inconsistencies with the artwork. There’s supposed to be this singular vision of what the Superior Spider-Man is, but he looks different every couple issues.

    Plus, no matter how many times Slott said, “No more Parker” you knew he was coming back. Mainly because they’ve had Otto burning just about every bridge he can for Peter and Spider-Man alike.

    I’m no purist, so I can appreciate a different take on an ongoing character. It’s been overall enjoyable.

  2. Pamp

    I agree regarding Superior Spider-Man and the inconsistencies with the artwork. There’s supposed to be this singular vision of what the Superior Spider-Man is, but he looks different every couple issues.

    Plus, no matter how many times Slott said, “No more Parker” you knew he was coming back. Mainly because they’ve had Otto burning just about every bridge he can for Peter and Spider-Man alike.

    I’m no purist, so I can appreciate a different take on an ongoing character. It’s been overall enjoyable.

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